try a chapter part 2 (more books to unhaul?)

3 weeks ago, I did a ‘try a chapter’ post in which I read the first chapter of 5 books and then decided whether to keep the book or to unhaul it. I had originally picked 10 books off my shelves for this post, but kept it down to 5 in my original post because I didn’t want it to be too long. Today, I’m back with part 2! Let’s see whether I’ll keep any of these, shall we?

 the gunslinger

the gunslinger

In the first book of this brilliant series, Stephen King introduces readers to one of his most enigmatic heroes, Roland of Gilead, The Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting figure, a loner on a spellbinding journey into good and evil. 

my thoughts on the first chapter

I finished reading this chapter, and have honestly no idea what on Earth I just read. My brain did not retain anything other than the word ‘ideograph’ being mentioned 2 times in one chapter, as well as ideogram. Had no idea what that meant, and had to look it up, which is why I remembered. King fans, please don’t kill me. I’m getting rid of this… Sometimes,  you don’t get along with the writing style of a novel, and this is one of those times. Another (minor) gripe is that his chapters never start on a new page. I don’t know why that bothers me so much, but it does.

the dinner

the dinnerA summer’s evening in Amsterdam and two couples meet at a fashionable restaurant. Each couple has a fifteen-year-old son. Together, the boys have committed a horrifying act, caught on camera, and their grainy images have been beamed into living rooms across the nation; despite a police manhunt, the boys remain unidentified – by everyone except their parents.

my thoughts on the first chapter

I’m not sure how I feel about this book yet. I think I might get rid of it, and try reading it in the original language later. My library does have a copy of the Dutch version, so I could do that for free. I want to know whether the ‘odd’ writing style is due to the translation or whether it’s the author himself. I do want to know what the boys did, even if I already dislike the main male character (the father of one of the two boys).

the keeper of lost causes

the keeper of lost causesCarl Mørck used to be one of Copenhagen’s best homicide detectives. Then a hail of bullets destroyed the lives of two fellow cops, and Carl—who didn’t draw his weapon—blames himself. So a promotion is the last thing he expects. But Department Q is a department of one, and Carl’s got only a stack of Copenhagen’s coldest cases for company.

my thoughts on the first chapter

I read the prologue and first chapter of The Keeper of Lost Causes, as I thought it only fair. I would never skip a prologue when starting a novel either. Both were quite captivating, which makes for an easy decision. I’m definitely keeping this book. I want to know what happened in the murder case that got his colleagues shot, and I need to find out what happened to the liberal politician who disappeared. She seems like a fighter.

lock in

lock inFifteen years from now, a new virus sweeps the globe. 95% of those afflicted experience nothing worse than fever and headaches. 4% suffer acute meningitis, creating the largest medical crisis in history. And 1% find themselves ‘locked in’ – fully awake and aware, but unable to move or respond to stimulus. A few rare individuals have brains that are receptive to being controlled by others, allowing those who are locked in to occasionally ‘ride’ these people and use their bodies as if they were their own.

my thoughts on the first chapter

While the premise of this book does sound interesting, I can’t seem to connect to the book itself. I bought Locked In a few years ago, and read about 80 pages at the time. I don’t remember any of it at this point in time, which made it a perfect book for the try a chapter post. After reading the first chapter again, I think I’m just going to unhaul it. Despite the intriguing synopsis, I’m not very interested in actually reading this.

the lake house (aan de rand van het meer)

aan de rand van het meer

A missing child, an abandoned house, an unsolved mystery. Living on her family’s idyllic lakeside estate in Cornwall, England, Alice Edevane is a bright, inquisitive, innocent, and precociously talented sixteen-year-old who loves to write stories. But the mysteries she pens are no match for the one her family is about to endure.

my thoughts on the first chapter

I bought the Dutch translation of The Lake House at a garage sale, but haven’t picked it up yet. It’s quite an intimidating book, because it’s around 500 pages and has the tiniest font ever. After reading the first chapter, I’m still not quite sure what to do with it. It was fascinating, and it does sound like a story I would enjoy reading. However, I’m quite intimidated by the size of this novel and the genre being somewhat out of my comfort zone. Is that really a reason to get rid of it, though? I’m keeping it for now, but may revise my opinion later…

Have you read any of these books? 

10 thoughts on “try a chapter part 2 (more books to unhaul?)

  1. I keep taking The Dinner off and putting it back on my list. I can’t decide. You aren’t missing much with The Gunslinger (and I am a King fan) though I hear the series gets better with time.

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    1. I’m glad to hear I’m not missing much! I think I’ll try The Dinner in Dutch at some point. I feel like I need to get rid of it on my shelves, but then I do want to give it a go at some point. It seems like we both have trouble making a decision on that one!

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      1. I have a “read me maybe” shelf for books like that, like I want to read it, but I know I don’t want to read it right now, or it’s not priority for whatever reason.

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        1. I already have a interested-in-reading shelf for the books I do eventually want to read but don’t have as much priority as the normal to-read ones. I feel like I’ll be creating shelves forever 😀

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  2. I’ve read two of the books you’re dumping! I read The Gunslinger and really liked it, but I tend to adore Stephen King in general. 🙂 I never did finish the series (I’ve read the first 3), but I do intend to go back.

    I’ve also read Locked In, and loved it. The premise really is fascinating. (There’s a novella, Unlocked, that’s written in the style of an oral history, and it really helps to get the background of the disease and how it changed society.)

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  3. I haven’t read any of these but I do have The Gunslinger. I hope I might like it though I’ve heard so many mixed things about it already. But I’ll read it and then watch the movie and see if I care haha.

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